Have you become a fan of my facebook page yet? I’d love for you to do so. Below is a lovely and courageous conversation that occurred on my page.

Me: Botox is a valid treatment option. But it may take more than 1 treatment to achieve full effects. With this treatment (my very first) I had about 3 solid weeks of dryness, but then it wore off.

Hi. How are you feeling now? Did it work? Let me know what are the different approaches you tried out. I’m planning to start my preliminary treatment in September.

Me: Thank you for liking my page. 🙂 I’ve tried a beta blocker (Toprol), an anticholinergic (Robinul Forte), Drysol, Certain Dri (I prefer the solid over the liquid, as it doesn’t make me itch), and I had some success with Transderm Scop patches as a side effect after using them for something else. My dermatologist currently is doing some research for me on the long-term use of the patches and/or Catapres tablets. I’m also working with a naturopath and experimenting with different natural supplements and herbs in an attempt to calm down my central nervous system. I had a good experience with the Botox overall, although I was only dry for a solid 3 weeks. I don’t regret doing it at all, and I was fortunate to receive the treatment thanks to an educational grant from Allergan, the makers of Botox, who partnered with the International Hyperhidrosis Society to provide the treatment. If you opt to try Botox, I’d pursue getting your insurance to cover it, if you have insurance. It’s very expensive out of pocket, so I suggest you exhaust all other options before trying this, and especially before looking into the ETS surgery. Please visit the International Hyperhidrosis Society’s website at www.sweathelp.org. They are the leading authority on HH and are an excellent resource!

Thanks a ton for all the info. I’ll ping you back. I have lots of questions that have been unanswered for many years. This disease is almost culminating my career. If I don’t get a reprieve   in 3 years, I’ll retire.

Me: I’m sorry to hear that! What exactly do you do for a living, if you don’t mind sharing?

I don’t know how well I can explain, but I’ll do my best. I’m a software engineer. My work needs me to meet people regularly, give PowerPoint presentations, talk with lots of people. When I shake hands they think I’m tensed, and I also have this weird kind of physiological feeling that automatically makes me tensed before meeting anyone. Somehow I feel the other person is gonna feel my sweat and it automatically makes me feel bad and even sweat more. Also, my shirt gets wet around the armpits. My level of speaking, thinking, and solving problems automatically goes down wth all these. Recently I graduated with my masters. I interviewed with 30+ companies. I did well in most of the interviews but couldn’t get through any of them. I don’t find any reason to reject me unless they think I’m feeling tensed. This disease did enough damage already and I’m pushed back.  Even though I have enough talent I’m pushed back. I’m planning to do an MBA, which needs even more interaction and networking. I need a permanent solution and I don’t care if it has any negative effects.

Me: I understand what you’re going through. I used to worry a lot more about the other person whose hand I was shaking, like I had to apologize for something I couldn’t even control. But it’s not our fault we have this condition! Hyperhidrosis is under-recognized and under-treated. I encourage you to get to the point where you feel comfortable giving a disclaimer to people that you suffer from a medical condition and truly can’t control your body’s sweat response. Allow them to know that you have it, but that it’s not all that you are. Chances are, they are less aware of your sweat than you think. We are hyper aware of it, but most people usually brush it off as just a clammy handshake. You must portray confidence because you ARE confident. Free yourself by freeing your sweat. It takes courage for us to live and interact with a dry world when we are so sweaty. So you can already do this. There is hope and there are treatment options. I think we talked a bit about this on the IHHS’s page, too, but they can help you. They have, and continue to help me. You are not alone, and you are not an outcast. I hope this helps and doesn’t sound like a bunch of fluff talk. I mean what I am saying and I know how you are feeling.

Thanks a lot. I don’t know who you are, but it feels comfortable to find people of the same kind.


 

“Friendship is born at that moment when one person says to another, “What?! You, too? I thought I was the only one.” – C.S. Lewis

 

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